?

Log in

No account? Create an account
iphthime [Just Hungry] [Electoral Vote] [Cecil Adams "Fighting Ignorance since 1973"] Below are the 10 most recent journal entries recorded in the "iphthime" journal:

[<< Previous 10 entries]

September 24th, 2011
02:35 pm

[Link]

How end-of-life care costs $600k
"End-of-Life Warning at $618,616 Makes Me Wonder Was It Worth It"

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=avRFGNF6Qw_w

"The bills totaled $618,616, almost two- thirds of it for the final 24 months, much of it for treatments that no one can say for sure helped extend his life.

In just the last four days of trying to keep him alive -- two in intensive care, two in a cancer ward -- our insurance was charged $43,711 for doctors, medicines, monitors, X-rays and scans. Two years later, the only thing I know for certain that money bought was confirmation that he was dying.

Some of the drugs probably did Terence no good at all. At least one helped fewer than 10 percent of all those who took it. Pharmaceutical companies and insurers will have to sort out the economics of treatments that end up working for only a small subset. Should everyone have the right to try them? Terence and I answered yes. Each drug potentially added life. Yet that too led me to a question I can’t answer. When is it time to quit? "

Tags: ,

(Leave a comment)

August 31st, 2011
02:35 am

[Link]

another health policy linkfest
America’s inefficient health-care system: another look
http://lanekenworthy.net/2011/07/10/americas-inefficient-health-care-system-another-look/
"Our gain in life expectancy per additional health spending is much smaller than in other countries, particularly after the early 1980s when we reached expenditures of about $2,500 per person (in 2005 dollars) and life expectancy of around 74-75 years.

The advantage of analyzing country differences in change is that it takes constant nation-specific factors out of play. It’s not a foolproof analytical strategy, but it reduces the likelihood of mistakenly inferring causation from correlation."


Uwe Reinhart,
http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/10/producing-more-primary-care-doctors/

"A more plausible theory is that residents themselves amply reimburse teaching hospitals for the cost of training by the long hours they work at wages far below what these residents add to the hospitals’ revenue. With proper managerial accounting, I maintain, residency programs would be found to produce net profits at teaching hospitals — as the hospitals would quickly learn if they had to replace the labor of residents with regular, similarly skilled employees...

If, by law, teaching hospitals were prohibited from paying residents in some specialties any stipends, these residents might view the need to borrow $50,000 or so annually for living expenses as a sound investment, at least in theory.

Drs. Bach and Kocher appear to believe that an adequate number of medical-school graduates would see it that way — but also that some now choosing specialty training would opt for primary-care training instead.

But such forfeiture of their salaries for several years might alter the attitudes these specialists would subsequently bring to medical practice — and the fees they might charge for services and care. In medical parlance, the Bach-Kocher treatment might have unintended and untoward side effects. It behooves policy makers to think of them."


On Addiction Treatment
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/11/health/11addictions.html?smid=tw-nytimes&seid=auto

"In the latest evidence, 10 medical institutions have just introduced the first accredited residency programs in addiction medicine, where doctors who have completed medical school and a primary residency will be able to spend a year studying the relationship between addiction and brain chemistry."


In Defense of Antidepressants
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/10/opinion/sunday/10antidepressants.html?pagewanted=all

Antioxidants don't work, but no one wants to hear it.
(Kent Sepkowitz)
http://www.slate.com/id/2300578/pagenum/all/
"In fact, as Emily Anthes wrote last year in Slate, the best available data demonstrate that antioxidants are bad for you—so long as you count an increased risk of death as "bad.""

Tags: ,

(Leave a comment)

02:29 am

[Link]

How to get to 35 terawatts
which is apparently a reasonable estimate of global energy consumption in 2050.

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/3000/followup-why-dont-we-ditch-nukes-em-and-em-coal

Tags:

(2 comments | Leave a comment)

02:26 am

[Link]

US inequality
http://www.zerohedge.com/article/20-facts-about-us-inequality-everyone-should-know

http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2011/05/25/136651969/whats-a-middle-class-income-contd?ft=1&f=93559255
"Incomes grow much, much faster at the top end of the income distribution than in the middle or at the bottom end."

http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/13/how-to-cut-child-poverty-in-half/

"Britain has used standard policy tools to reduce its child-poverty rate by more than half since 1994 and has effectively defended this progress against the pressures of the Great Recession..."

"The ordinary policies in Britain that led to what many Americans would consider extraordinary results were these: an increase in the national minimum wage (currently about $9.70 an hour, compared with our $7.25), tax incentives to encourage single parents to move into paid employment, increased public benefits for parents, provision of universal preschool and regulations making it easier for parents of young children to request flexible work schedules."

Tags:

(Leave a comment)

02:08 am

[Link]

all about the south asian rat plague (Mautam)
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/plant-vs-predator.html

http://www.projectmaje.org/mautam.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mautam

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assam

Tags: ,

(Leave a comment)

August 30th, 2011
02:25 am

[Link]

roald dahl
http://thisrecording.com/today/2011/6/1/in-which-we-consider-the-macabre-unpleasantness-of-roald-dah.html

Tags:

(Leave a comment)

August 29th, 2011
02:34 am

[Link]

debunking the skull-volume-measuring-bias claim?
Gould might have been mistaken:

The Mismeasure of Science: Stephen Jay Gould versus Samuel George Morton on Skulls and Bias
http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pbio.1001071

"We investigated these questions by remeasuring Morton's skulls and reexamining both Morton's and Gould's analyses. Our results resolve this historical controversy, demonstrating that Morton did not manipulate data to support his preconceptions, contra Gould. In fact, the Morton case provides an example of how the scientific method can shield results from cultural biases."

Tags:

(Leave a comment)

August 28th, 2011
02:55 am

[Link]

A math genius who gave up math
The genius who lives downstairs - extract
by Alexander Masters
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/aug/19/genius-downstairs-alexander-masters-extract

"The popular image of a brilliant mathematician is a man who looks like Simon, and spends 23 hours a day alone in his mother's attic solving the most difficult problem in existence. But Simon is a different and much more common type of mathematician. For his genius to flourish, he needs liveliness and company. Simon had no champions and few mathematical friends. There was no one to work with, so he did not work. The mathematics department refused to renew his contract. Never, said mathematicians, had they seen such a spectacular and thorough demotion. The career of one of the great mathematical prodigies of the 20th century was over."

(Leave a comment)

02:51 am

[Link]

Sitcoms used to be meaner than they are now...
The rise and fall of the mean sitcom.
http://www.slate.com/id/2289499/pagenum/all/

"Indeed, the truly cynical sitcoms of more recent memory might have been a reaction to the glut of family shows that flourished in the '80s, force-feeding viewers wisdom from the likes of Nell Carter and Charlotte Rae. Fox's Married with Children, which premiered in 1987, turned family dysfunction into a sort of contact sport. Seinfeld debuted three years later with a proud absence of redeeming characters or uplifting story lines. Creator Larry David's mantra was "no hugging, no learning," and that approach spread steadily across networks and formats."

Tags:

(Leave a comment)

August 27th, 2011
03:24 am

[Link]

"Secularism and its Discontents"
"Secularism and its Discontents"

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2011/08/15/110815crat_atlarge_wood?currentPage=all

"These are theological questions without theological answers, and, if the atheist is not supposed to entertain them, then, for slightly different reasons, neither is the religious believer. Religion assumes that they are not valid questions because it has already answered them; atheism assumes that they are not valid questions because it cannot answer them. But as one gets older, and parents and peers begin to die, and the obituaries in the newspaper are no longer missives from a faraway place but local letters, and one’s own projects seem ever more pointless and ephemeral, such moments of terror and incomprehension seem more frequent and more piercing, and, I find, as likely to arise in the middle of the day as the night."

[...]

"A wonderful essay by the historian and philosopher Robert J. Richards convincingly argues that Darwin was very slow to abandon the language of purpose and design in discussing evolution and natural selection. While he was writing “The Origin of Species,” he seems to have persisted in the belief that “events in nature had to be understood as occurring through natural law.” In the manuscript of the “Origin,” he defined nature as “the laws ordained by God to govern the Universe.” By the eighteen-sixties, Richards asserts, Darwin had “begun to waver in his conviction that natural law required an independent designing mind to provide its force”; by the end of that decade he had withdrawn any reliance upon belief in God. And yet, Richards concludes, “what he seems never to have abandoned is the ascription to natural selection itself of those properties of discrimination, power, and moral concern previously conferred on it by divine agency. These properties allowed the law of natural selection to lead to the end Darwin foresaw as the goal of the evolutionary process . . . namely, the natural creation of man as a moral creature.”"

(Leave a comment)

[<< Previous 10 entries]

Powered by LiveJournal.com